Google & Mastercard Are Linking Online Ads With Offline Purchases

There is a conspiracy theory in which some believe that your smartphone is listening to you, in which some have discovered some crazy coincidences about how something they were just talking about appeared as an ad on their phone. Now in an interesting reversal, it seems that the ads we see online are being tracked to see whether we end up making a purchase offline.

In a report from Bloomberg, the publication has exposed an alleged deal that Google and Mastercard have struck up, in which basically in order to see the effectiveness of online ads, Mastercard would supply Google with purchase information. How it works is that when a user browses a web using their Google account, Google will log the ads that they come across and click.

However if an offline purchase is made in the next 30 days using a Mastercard credit/debit card, Google will then alert the advertiser via a report about the effectiveness of the ad, and will also include an “offline revenue” section that will take that sale in account. This deal with Mastercard is said to have cost Google millions, although neither company has officially announced or confirmed this partnership.

That being said, Google has recently come under fire recently for its location tracking feature, in which they did not make it clear that users had to do more than just disable location tracking if they want to opt out of it completely. In the meantime companies such as Apple and Mozilla have plans to block ad trackers by default, where they will prevent these trackers from tracking users across multiple websites.

Google & Mastercard Are Linking Online Ads With Offline Purchases , original content from Ubergizmo. Read our Copyrights and terms of use.

Google and Mastercard are secretly tracking your offline purchases


Google has quietly been providing select advertisers a “stockpile” of offline credit card transaction data. After a four year negotiation, Google and Mastercard reached a deal that would pay the latter millions in exchange for coughing up data on its card holders, according to a Bloomberg report. Google then packaged the data into a new tool, called Store Sales Measurement, that allowed its customers to track whether online ads turned into real world retail sales. Neither company informed its users of the arrangement. For Mastercard, that means the bulk of its two billion customers have no knowledge of the behind-the-scenes…

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Apple’s first autonomous vehicle crash in California revealed by DMV

Apple has experienced its first autonomous car crash in California, state DMV records reveal. The incident happened on August 24 and, based on the publicly available report, was the result of a different vehicle that struck the rear of the autonomous car. The incident is reported to have happened during daylight hours and didn’t result in injuries. Details about the … Continue reading

Our favorite rumor is dead: Google confirms no Pixel watch release this year

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Sorry, folks! 

Google is not releasing a smartwatch this year.

The company confirmed on Friday in an interview with Tom’s Guide that it has no plans to release it’s own-branded smartwatch in 2018.

Tech news sites have been in a frenzy over the past few months over what many believed was proof that the company planned to launch its own competitor to the Apple Watch. The product was expected to be named the Google “Pixel” watch and sold as a compliment to the existing Pixel phone — but now that dream is dead.

The idea was that the Pixel watch would used to showcase the best of the company’s WearOS software, similar to the way existing Pixel phones show off the best features of Android. Google currently relies on hardware makers like Fossil, Michael Kors, and Tag Heuer to make the physical watches. Read more…

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Review: CalDigit’s Thunderbolt 3 Mini Docks Let You Connect to Dual 4K Displays Wherever You Go

Last month, CalDigit debuted a pair of Thunderbolt 3 mini Docks, offering the ability to connect dual 4K 60Hz displays, Ethernet, and USB all from one travel-sized accessory that doesn’t require its own external power source. Available in dual DisplayPort and dual HDMI versions, CalDigit’s Thunderbolt 3 mini Docks are a convenient way to make sure you can easily connect to multiple high-resolution displays wherever you go.



I’ve had an opportunity to test out both versions of the dock, and I came away impressed with their performance, compactness, and usefulness in making sure you have the connectivity you need available away from your usual workplace.

Design

Both versions of the Thunderbolt 3 mini Dock have the same primarily aluminum design with plastic on the two long edges where the ports line one side and the short built-in Thunderbolt 3 cable exits the other side. The aluminum is an attractive gray that’s significantly darker than Apple’s Space Gray shades, and there is a CalDigit logo on the top of the dock. The bottom includes a pair of non-skid strips to help keep the dock stable.



Both docks measure just under 5 inches long by about 2.5 inches deep and 0.75 inches thick. That makes them just a bit smaller but considerably thicker than an iPhone 8, and at a little over 5 ounces they’re just about the same weight as an iPhone 8 as well. Overall that makes them much smaller and lighter than a desktop Thunderbolt 3 dock, and they don’t require a massive power brick (or any external power beyond the Thunderbolt cable), so they’re very transportable.

The two versions each include a Gigabit Ethernet port, a 5 Gbps Type-A USB 3.0 port, and a pair of either DisplayPort 1.2 or HDMI 2.0 ports. The HDMI model also includes a second Type-A USB port, although it is limited to 480 Mb/s USB 2.0.

Performance

I tested the performance of both docks using an array of accessories and found solid performance. Both the DisplayPort and HDMI versions offered smooth video performance while connected to dual 4K displays running at 60 Hz with no lag or visual artifacts. You’ll want to choose the version that best fits your display needs, but keep in mind that the DisplayPort model can also drive non-DisplayPort monitors such as DVI, Mini DisplayPort, or VGA, as long as you don’t mind dongles for your dongle.



USB 3.0 speeds were fast, with a CaDigit Tuff external SSD registering speeds of 360 MB/s read and 340 MB/s write when connected to a MacBook Pro through the docks. That’s a little slower than a direct connection to a 5 Gbps USB port on a Mac, but in line with performance seen when connecting through other docks and hubs. You’ll be lucky to get much more than one-tenth of those speeds when connecting over the USB 2.0 port on the HDMI version of the mini dock, so you’ll want to limit that port to mice, keyboards, and other peripherals where you’re not trying to move a lot of data quickly.



While there are a number of bus-powered USB-C hubs and docks on the market that offer an array of ports and other options, CalDigit has opted to use Thunderbolt 3’s capabilities to focus on the external display connectivity and include only a bare minimum of additional ports.

CalDigit says this is in part an effort to remain within the Thunderbolt 3 power specifications, which limit bus-powered devices to a total of 15 watts of draw. USB-C adapters can in some cases be limited to 7.5 watts total, but with so many available ports on many of these docks, it’s easy to hit that figure and cause potential power issues. The USB 3.0 port on CalDigit’s mini docks can provide up to 4.5 watts, while the USB 2.0 port on the HDMI model can deliver up to 2.5 watts.

Wrap-up

These Thunderbolt 3 mini Docks meet a specialized need, catering to those who need to connect to multiple high-resolution external displays on the go, but they do their job well. If you’re primarily looking to expand the available ports on your MacBook Pro, you’ll likely want to look at other options that offer a greater number and variety of ports and can perhaps run over USB-C. These port-focused USB-C hubs also tend to come in at cheaper price points, with $60 being a common figure.

But CalDigit’s solution is great for users who need solid display connectivity that cheaper USB-C hubs can’t match, while also offering a couple of handy extras in the form of Ethernet and USB ports. Compared to traditional desktop Thunderbolt 3 docks, CalDigit’s mini docks are cheaper, easily portable, and don’t require external power, so they’re handy for on-the-go use.

CalDigit is currently offering the DisplayPort version of the Thunderbolt 3 mini Dock for $99.99, while the HDMI model is priced at $109.99, both a $30 discount over their eventual regular prices although CalDigit tells me it plans to offer the promotional pricing for an extended period of time. Both models are also available through Amazon, although they’re priced $10 higher than buying directly from CalDigit, coming in at $109.99 for DisplayPort and $119.99 for HDMI.

Note: CalDigit provided the Thunderbolt 3 mini Docks to MacRumors free of charge for the purposes of this review. No other compensation was received. MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Amazon and may earn commissions on purchases made through links in this article.

Tags: Thunderbolt 3, CalDigit

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WTF Do I Wear on a Cross-Country Flight?

Even though air travel is no longer the elegant, rarified mode of transportation it once was, we still have our mom’s advice ringing in our ears every time we lay our clothes out for the airport: “It’s nice to look nice—and you never know who you might meet.”

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